Solidworks routing handbuch


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Solidworks routing handbuch

When it comes to routing wires, we have two options at our disposal. Ultimately, we have to weigh our options. Manually routing wires is time consuming, but it will be precise. While automatically routing wires will be quicker, the final route may require some necessary adjustments. Harnesses can become a daunting task. Trying to automatically route a harness with all those wires, cables, connectors, and yes… splices.

What if there was a way to combine the speed of the automatic process, with the detail we need from the manual method? In comes, what I like to call hybrid routing. Pretty straightforward so far right? In the Route harnesses function, we need to uncheck the Route following path option and run the command.

We receive a notification about the routing path, but for this hybrid method, we will Create connection only. Upon completion, we notice that the harness is now in our feature tree. One of the first things we will do is turn on our guidelines. Turning the guidelines allows us to see what was actually routed in the previous step.

Here comes the fun part, which may also take a little pre-planning. Select the desired guidelines and run the command. We will begin to see our route coming together. At this point we would want to drag or edit the main trunk line to its desired position within the assembly.

Before we can add the remaining wires, we need to add split points. Each remaining wire needs at least one split, or in some cases, one point for each end of the wire. Each point can be used for multiple wires. You can also use the end points that have already been created when merging the guidelines. With our main line and split points put in place, again we will utilize the Auto Route command, but instead of merging, we will Join guidelines to existing routes.

This can be extremely useful when dealing with splices. Yes, you saw that correctly. I said splices. As long as you have split points in place, it will join the wires from splices or in-line components as well. You also have the option to simply convert a guideline to a route. This option will simply create a wire in in place of the guideline which can help speed the process up as well.

This hybrid method of routing can be a valuable tool in order to help customers visualize your design, as well as communicate your design intent to the rest of your team or partners. Menu Toggle navigation. Bio LinkedIn Latest Posts.

Start the route by inserting route components, which vary by route type, into the assembly. These components define the start and end connection points of the path. Then create the route by using a 3D sketch to define the centerline of the path. The software generates the pipe, tube, and wire parts along the centerline and connects the parts to the route components. Fittings and connectors include flanges, elbows, tees, valves, wiring harnesses and wiring clips.

Fittings and connectors are typically used to begin and end routes, and to guide and control the route path. After you enable the Routing application, open an assembly file and start the route. Routing requires some setup to run and work properly. Before starting a route, review the default settings in System Options. Use the form below to send your comments and suggestions about this topic directly to our documentation team.

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To report problems encountered with the Web help interface and search, contact your local support representative. All rights reserved. The Basics of Routing Start the route by inserting route components, which vary by route type, into the assembly. Contents Route Components: Fittings and Connectors Fittings and connectors include flanges, elbows, tees, valves, wiring harnesses and wiring clips.

Pipe, Tube, Electrical, and User Defined Parts These parts are available in the Routing Library. Start the Route After you enable the Routing application, open an assembly file and start the route. Setting Routing Options and File Locations Routing requires some setup to run and work properly. Parent topic Getting Started. Thank you for your comments. We will contact you if we have questions regarding your feedback. Print Topic Select the scope of content to print: Just this topic This topic and all topics linked from this topic This topic and all children of the topic in the table of contents up to 7 topics.

Never show this message again. Other versions:. Feedback on this topic. User Interface. Moving from 2D to 3D. Design Checker. Detailing and Drawings. SLDXML Data Exchange. Import and Export. Model Display. Mold Design. Motion Studies. Parts and Features. Enabling the Routing Add-In. Getting Started. Route Types. The Basics of Routing.

Modeling a Typical Piping Route. Methods for Modeling Electrical Routes. Modeling a User Defined Route. Route with Clips. Modeling Routes as External or Virtual Files. Assemblies as Routing Components. Routing Toolbars. Routing Templates. Route Properties Overview. Mating in Routing Subassemblies. Routing Libraries and the Routing Component Wizard. Routing Naming Conventions. Routing Points. Pipes and Tubes Routes. Electrical Routes. User Defined Routes. Manage Routing Assemblies.

Routing Library Manager. Sheet Metal. Workgroup PDM. Just this topic. This topic and all topics linked from this topic. This topic and all children of the topic in the table of contents up to 7 topics.